Operation Husky order of battle

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Operation Husky order of battle is a listing of the significant military and air force units that were involved in the campaign for Sicily, July 10 – August 17, 1943.

Allied forces[edit]

Allied Forces Headquarters - Mediterranean
Supreme Commander: General Dwight D. Eisenhower

Allied 15th Army Group[edit]

The Allied 15th Army Group was under the command of General Sir Harold Alexander.[1]

U.S. Seventh Army[edit]

Waiting to load Tanks in La Pècherie French base in French Tunisia.
American and British troops landing near Gela, Sicily, July 10, 1943.

The U.S. Seventh Army was commanded by Lieutenant General George S. Patton.

U.S. II Corps[edit]

The U.S. II Corps was commanded by Lieutenant General Omar Bradley.

U.S. Provisional Corps[edit]

(Headquarters activated on 15 July 1943)[2] Commanded by Major General Geoffrey Keyes.

British Eighth Army[edit]

The British Eighth Army was under the command of General Sir Bernard Montgomery. The British 46th Infantry Division formed a floating reserve, but it did not participate in the Sicily campaign.

Army Troops

British XIII Corps[edit]

XIII Corps was commanded by Lieutenant-General Miles Dempsey.

British XXX Corps[edit]

XXX Corps was commanded by Lieutenant-General Sir Oliver Leese.

Allied Mediterranean Naval Command[edit]

The Naval forces were under the command of Admiral of the Fleet Sir. Andrew Cunningham and was divided into several Task Forces.[1]

Covering Force[edit]

The role of the covering force was to prevent the Italian Navy from attacking the invasion forces.

Eastern Naval Task Force[edit]

Eastern Naval task Force transported the Eastern Task Force (British Eighth Army) and provided Naval gunfire support.[1]

Western Naval Task Force[edit]

The Western Naval Task Force transported the Western Task Force (Seventh U.S. Army) and provided Naval gunfire support.[1][15]

Allied Air Forces[edit]

At the time of Operation Husky, the Allied air forces in the North African and Mediterranean theatres were organized as the Mediterranean Air Command (MAC) under the command of Air Chief Marshal Sir Arthur Tedder of the Royal Air Force. The major subdivisions of the MAC included the Northwest African Air Forces (NAAF) under the command of Lt. General Carl Spaatz of the U.S. Army Air Forces, the American 12th Air Force (also commanded by Gen. Spaatz), the American 9th Air Force under the command of Lt. General Lewis H. Brereton, and units of the British Royal Air Force (RAF).

Also supporting the NAAF were the RAF Middle East Command, Air Headquarters Malta, RAF Gibraltar, and the No. 216 (Transfer and Ferry) Group, which were subdivisions of MAC under the command of Tedder. He reported to the Supreme Allied Commander Dwight D. Eisenhower for the NAAF operations, but to the British Chiefs of Staff for RAF Command operations. Air Headquarters Malta, under the command of Air Vice-Marshal Sir Keith Park, also supported Operation Husky.

The "Desert Air Task Force" consisting of American B-25 Mitchell medium bombers (the 12th and 340th Bombardment Groups) and Curtiss P-40 Warhawk fighters (the 57th, 79th, and 324th Fighter Groups) from the 9th Air Force served under the command of Air Marshal Sir Arthur Coningham of the Northwest African Tactical Air Force. These bomber and fighter groups moved to new airfields on Sicily as soon as a significant beachhead had been captured there.

In the MAC organization established at the Casablanca Conference in January 1943, the 9th Air Force was assigned as a subdivision of the RAF Middle East Command under the command of Air Chief Marshal Sir Sholto Douglas.[17][18][19][20]

Mediterranean Air Command (Allied)[edit]

Air Chief Marshal Sir Arthur Tedder had his headquarters in Algiers, Algeria.[21]

Principle Sicilian targets of the Northwest African Air Forces for Operation Husky.
Northwest African Air Forces[edit]

Lt. General Carl Spaatz had his headquarters for the Northwest African Air Forces in Maison-Carrée, Algeria[21]

Northwest African Strategic Air Force[edit]

Maj. General James H. Doolittle, in command of the Northwest African Strategic Air Force, had his headquarters in Constantine, Algeria[21]

  • 5th Bombardment Wing (Heavy)
Northwest African Coastal Air Force[edit]

Air Vice-Marshal Sir Hugh Lloyd also had his headquarters in Algiers.[21]

Source[23][24]
British Units American Units
RAF Units 52nd Fighter Group
Lt. Colonel James Coward
Royal Navy Fleet Air Arm Units
Torpedo Spotter Reconnaissance
81st Fighter Group
Lt. Colonel Michael Gordon

Oran, Algeria Sector:
92nd Squadron, Bell P-39 Airacobra fighters
1st Air Defense Wing:
91st Squadron, P-39 Airacobras
93rd Squadron, P-39 Airacobras

Bone, Algeria Sector: 350th Fighter Group
Lt. Colonel Marvin McNickle
2nd Air Defense Wing:

No. 153 Squadron, Beaufighters

480th Antisubmarine Group
Colonel Jack Roberts

Notes:

  1. The 1st and 2nd Antisubmarine Squadrons were assigned to NACAF for administration and placed under the operational control of the U.S. Navy Fleet Air Wing 15 of the Moroccan Sea Frontier commanded by Rear Admiral (United States) Frank J. Lowry
  2. Air Ministry was asked to provide two additional Wellington patrol squadrons.[clarification needed] Asked? This is supposed to be an accurate historical document. Many things get asked for, but many less get provided.
Northwest African Tactical Air Force[edit]

Air Marshal Sir Arthur Coningham had his headquarters in Hammamet, Tunisia[21]

Air Vice Marshal Harry Broadhurst

Air Commodore Laurence Sinclair[25][26]

For Operation Husky, No. 242 Group, originally a component of NATAF in February 1943, was assigned to the Northwest African Coastal Air Force (NACAF). At the same time, Air Headquarters, Western Desert became known as the Desert Air Force. All of the fighter units of Desert Air Force formed No. 211 (Offensive Fighter) Group commanded by Air Commodore Richard Atcherley on April 11, 1943 in Tripoli. The 99th Fighter Squadron was assigned to the XII Air Support Command on May 28, 1943, and later made a part of the 33rd Fighter Group.

Northwest African Troop Carrier Command[edit]

United States Paul Williams, in Tunisia

51st Troop Carrier Wing
Brig. General Ray Dunn
52nd Troop Carrier Wing
Colonel Harold Clark
RAF Detachment
60th Troop Carrier Group
Lt. Colonel Frederick Sherwood

10th Squadron, C-47 Skytrains
11th Squadron, C-47s
12th Squadron, C-47s
28th Squadron, C-47s

61st Troop Carrier Group
Colonel Willis Mitchell
No. 38 Wing

Air Commodore William Primrose

62nd Troop Carrier Group
Lt. Colonel Aubrey Hurren

4th Squadron, C-47 Skytrains
7th Squadron, C-47s
8th Squadron, C-47s
51st Squadron, C-47s

313th Troop Carrier Group
Colonel James Roberts, Jr.

29th Squadron, C-47s
47th Squadron, C-47s
48th Squadron, C-47s
49th Squadron, C-47s

An Albemarle towing a Horsa glider.
64th Troop Carrier Group
Colonel John Cerny

16th Squadron, C-47 Skytrains
17th Squadron, C-47s
18th Squadron, C-47s
35th Squadron, C-47s

314th Troop Carrier Group
Colonel Clayton Stiles

32nd Squadron, C-47s
50th Squadron, C-47s
61st Squadron, C-47s
62nd Squadron, C-47s

Information in table taken from:

1) Participation of the Ninth and
Twelfth Air Forces in the Sicilian Campaign,
Army Air Forces Historical Study No. 37
Army Air Forces Historical Office Headquarters,
Maxwell Air Force Base, Alabama, 1945.

316th Troop Carrier Group
Colonel Jerome McCauley

36th Squadron, C-47 Skytrains
44th Squadron, C-47s
45th Squadron, C-47s

Information in table taken from:

2) Maurer, Maurer, Air Force
Combat Units Of World War II,
Office of Air Force History,
Maxwell AFB, Alabama, 1983.

To help carry out transport and supply operations for Operation Husky, in mid-1943 the American 315th Troop Carrier Group (34th & 43rd Squadrons) had been flown from England to Tunisia. There it was assigned to the Mediterranean Air Transport Service, and along with NATCC, this was a subdivision of the Mediterranean Air Command.

Northwest African Photographic Reconnaissance Wing[edit]

Colonel Elliott Roosevelt had his headquarters at La Marsa, Tunisia

Northwest African Air Service Command[edit]

Brig. General Delmar had his headquarters in Dunton, Algiers.[21]

Northwest African Training Command[edit]

Brig. General John K. Cannon,
U.S. APO 525[21]

Air Headquarters Malta[edit]

Air Vice-Marshal Keith Park, the commander of Air Headquarters Malta, had his headquarters in Valletta, Malta[27]

Mosquito fighter planes

No. 216 (Transport and Ferry) Group[edit]

Air Commodore Whitney Straight, Headquarters at Heliopolis, Egypt[27]

RAF Gibraltar[edit]

Air Vice Marshal Sturley Simpson had his headquarters in Gibraltar

Middle East Command[edit]

Air Marshal Sir Sholto Douglas Headquarters at Cairo, Egypt[21]

No. 201 (Naval Co-operation) Group[edit]

Air Vice Marshal Thomas Langsford-Sainsbury, Headquarters at Alexandria, Egypt

No Wing assignment: 701 Naval Air Squadron (FAA), Walrus Air-Sea Rescue

Note: RAF=Royal Air Force; RAAF=Royal Australian Air Force; SAAF=South African Air Force; FAA=Fleet Air Arm (Royal Navy); Det.= "detachment"

Air Headquarters Air Defences Eastern Mediterranean[edit]

Air Vice Marshal Richard Saul

No. 209 (Fighter) Group
Group Captain R.C.F. Lister
No. 210 (Fighter) Group
Group Captain John Grandy
No. 212 (Fighter) Group
Air Commodore Archibald Wann
No. 219 (Fighter) Group
Group Captain Max Aitken
No. 46 Squadron RAF Det., Beaufighters No. 3 Squadron SAAF, Hurricanes No. 7 Squadron SAAF, Hurricanes No. 46 Squadron RAF, Beaufighters
No. 127 Squadron RAF, Hurricanes and Spitfires No. 33 Squadron RAF, Hurricanes No. 41 Squadron SAAF, Hurricanes No. 74 Squadron RAF, Hurricanes
No. 89 Squadron RAF, Beaufighters No. 80 Squadron RAF, Spitfires No. 238 Squadron RAF, Hurricanes
No. 213 Squadron RAF, Hurricanes No. 94 Squadron RAF, Hurricanes No. 335 Squadron RAF, Hurricanes
No. 274 Squadron RAF, Hurricanes No. 108 Squadron RAF Det., Beaufighters No. 336 Squadron RAF, Hurricanes
No. 123 Squadron RAF, Hurricanes No. 451 Squadron RAAF, Hurricanes
No. 134 Squadron RAF, Hurricanes
No. 237 Squadron RAF, Hurricanes
No. 1563 Met. Flight, Gloster Gladiators
No. 1654 Met. Flight, Gladiators

Notes:
SAAF=South African Air Force; RAAF=Royal Australian Air Forces; Det.=Detached; Met.=Meteorological.

U.S. 9th Air Force[edit]

Major General Lewis H. Brereton had his headquarters in Cairo, Egypt[21]

Axis Forces[edit]

Armed Forces Command Sicily[edit]

The Armed Forces Command Sicily based in Enna under Generale d'Armata Alfredo Guzzoni had command of all axis forces on Sicily.

Italian 6th Army[edit]

The Royal Italian Army's 6th Army co-located with Armed Forces Command Sicily in Enna and also commanded by Generale d'Armata Alfredo Guzzoni had command of all Royal Italian Army and German Army units on Sicily.[nb 2]
The German Army Liaison Officer was Generalleutnant Fridolin von Senger und Etterlin

The 6th Army fielded more than 100 Anti-paratrooper units of about 30 men each. These units, with the oldest available local reservists, were tasked with searching for allied personnel - paratroopers and pilots - which had parachuted into Siciliy behind the frontline.

Italian XII Army Corps[edit]
  • XII Army Corps, in Corleone - Generale di Corpo d'Armata Mario Arisio, from 12 July: Generale di Corpo d'Armata Francesco Zingales - responsible for Sicily to the West of a line from Cefalù to Licata[30]
    • 12th Army Corps Artillery Grouping
      • XIX Motorized Artillery Group (105/28 howitzers)
      • XXI Motorized Artillery Group (105/28 howitzers)
      • XXII Motorized Artillery Group (105/28 howitzers)
      • XLVIII Motorized Artillery Group (105/28 howitzers)
      • CXXI Motorized Artillery Group (149/13 howitzers)
      • CXXII Motorized Artillery Group (149/13 howitzers)
    • VII Anti-aircraft Artillery Group (75/46 anti-aircraft guns)
    • CIV Anti-tank Battalion, in Agrigento (47/32 anti-tank guns) (detached to 177th Mobile Territorial Bersaglieri Regiment)
    • CX Motorized Artillery Group (75/27 field guns; 2nd Battery detached to Mobile Group "A")
    • CLI Coastal Artillery Group (149/19 heavy guns, reinforcements from the Italian mainland)
    • CCXXXIII Motorized Artillery Group (75/27 field guns; detached to 26th Infantry Division "Assietta")
    • I Bersaglieri Anti-tank Battalion, in Corleone (47/32 anti-tank guns)
    • 1x Engineer battalion
    • 2x Bersaglieri motorcyclist companies
    • 2x Anti-aircraft artillery batteries (20/65 anti-aircraft guns)
    • Army Corps Services
Coastal Troops Command[edit]
  • Coastal Troops Command - Generale di Divisione Giovanni Marciani
    • 136th (Autonomous) Coastal Regiment - responsible for the coast from the East of Palermo to including Cefalù
      • CIII Coastal Battalion
      • CDLXV Coastal Battalion
    • 202nd Coastal Division - Generale di Brigata Gino Ficalbi - responsible for the coast from Mazara del Vallo to Sciacca
      • 124th Coastal Regiment
        • CCCLXXVI Coastal Battalion
        • CCCLXXXVI Coastal Battalion
        • DXLIII Coastal Battalion
      • 142nd Coastal Regiment
        • CCCLXXVII Coastal Battalion
        • CDXXVII Coastal Battalion
        • CDLXVI Coastal Battalion
        • CDXC Coastal Battalion
      • 62nd Coastal Artillery Grouping
        • LVI Coastal Artillery Group (149/35 heavy guns)
        • LXXVI Coastal Artillery Group (149/35 heavy guns)
        • CLXXI Coastal Artillery Group (105/28 howitzers)
        • CLXXII Coastal Artillery Group (105/28 howitzers)
      • 63rd Coastal Artillery Grouping
        • LV Coastal Artillery Group 105/32 field guns)
        • CXLI Coastal Artillery Group (75/27 field guns)
        • CXLIII Coastal Artillery Group (149/35 howitzers))
        • CLVII Coastal Artillery Group (149/19 howitzers)
      • CCCIII Coastal Battalion
      • CIX Static Machine Gun Battalion
      • 151st Bersaglieri Motorcyclists Company
      • 102nd Mortar Company (81mm Mod. 35 mortars)
      • Division Services
    • 207th Coastal Division, in Agrigento - Generale di Brigata Ottorino Schreiber, later Generale di Brigata Augusto De Laurentiis - responsible for the coast from Sciacca to Punta Due Rocche to the East of Licata
      • 138th Coastal Regiment
        • CCCLXXX Coastal Battalion
        • CCCLXXXVIII Coastal Battalion
        • CDXX Coastal Battalion
      • 139th Coastal Regiment, in Licata
        • CDXIX Coastal Battalion
        • CCCXC Coastal Battalion
        • DXXXVIII Coastal Battalion
      • 177th Mobile Territorial Bersaglieri Regiment (attached)
        • DXXV Bersaglieri Battalion
        • DXXVI Bersaglieri Battalion
        • DXXVII Bersaglieri Battalion
        • CIV Anti-tank Battalion (47/32 anti-tank guns; detached from 12th Army Corps Artillery Grouping)
        • 1st Motorized Machine Gun Company (attached)
      • 12th Coastal Artillery Grouping
        • XXXV Coastal Artillery Group (3x 105/28 and 1x 75/27 batteries)
        • CXLV Coastal Artillery Group (2x 105/28 and 1x 75/34 batteries)
        • CLX Coastal Artillery Group (2x 149/35 and 1x 105mm/27 batteries)
        • CCXXII Coastal Artillery Group (2x 100/22 batteries)
      • CIV Coastal Battalion
      • CV Static Machine Gun Battalion
      • 103rd Mortar Company (81mm Mod. 35 mortars)
      • Division Services
    • 208th Coastal Division - Generale di Divisione Giovanni Marciani (nominal) - Colonel Dal Monte (effective) - responsible for the coast from Palermo to Trapani
      • 133rd Coastal Regiment
        • CCXLIV Coastal Battalion
        • CDXXIII Coastal Battalion
        • CDXCVIII Coastal Battalion
      • 147th Coastal Regiment
        • CCCLXXVIII Coastal Battalion
        • CDXXXVIII Coastal Battalion
        • DXXXIX Coastal Battalion
      • 28th Coastal Artillery Grouping
        • CXXIV Coastal Artillery Group (105/14 howitzers
        • CCXV Coastal Artillery Group (100/17 howitzers)
      • CXII Machine Gun Battalion
      • 164th Anti-tank Company (47/32 anti-tank guns)
      • 101st Mortar Company (81mm Mod. 35 mortars)
      • 517th Mortar Company (81mm Mod. 35 mortars)
      • Division Services
    • 230th Coastal Division - Generale di Divisione Egisto Conti - responsible for the coast from the South of Trapani to Mazara del Vallo (division raised on 1 June 1943 from personnel of the 8th Marching Division and arrived in Sicily on 3 July 1943, augmented with units of the 202nd Coastal Division)
      • 120th Coastal Regiment
        • CCXLV Coastal Battalion
        • DCCCLVII Coastal Battalion
        • DCCCLXXX Coastal Battalion
      • 184th Coastal Regiment
        • CCCLXXXVII Coastal Battalion
        • CDXCVII Coastal Battalion
      • 43rd Coastal Artillery Grouping
        • VII Coastal Artillery Group (1x 149/35 and 1x 155/36 batteries)
        • XX Coastal Artillery Group (1x 149/35 and 1x 155/36 batteries)
        • XXII Coastal Artillery Group (105/28 howitzers)
        • CCXVIII Coastal Artillery Group (100/22 howitzers)
      • 712th Machine Gun Company
      • Division Services
    • XXIX Coastal Brigade - Harbor Defense Command "N", in Palermo[31] - Generale di Divisione Giuseppe Molinero
      • CCCIV Coastal Battalion
      • CCCXLIV Coastal Battalion
      • CDLXXVI Coastal Battalion
      • XXX Dismounted Squadrons Group/ Regiment "Cavalleggeri di Palermo"
      • I Group/ 25th Artillery Regiment "Assietta"/ 26th Infantry Division "Assietta" (100/17 howitzers)
      • XLI Coastal Artillery Group
        • 121st Battery, at Punta la Barbara (2x 152/45 cannons)
        • 122nd Battery, at Aspra (2x 152/45 cannons)
        • 2x batteries (1x with 75/27 field guns, 1x with 105/28 howitzers)
      • 51st Heavy Artillery Battery
Tactical Groups[edit]

Tactical groups were created from corps assets and detached units of the army corps's two infantry divisions. The groups were deployed near the beaches most likely to be used by the allies.

  • Tactical Group "Chiusa Sclafani", in Chiusa Sclafani
    • 10th Bersaglieri Regiment
      • XXXV Bersaglieri Battalion
      • LXXIII Bersaglieri Battalion
      • LXXIV Bersaglieri Battalion
    • CIII Motorized Artillery Group (75/27 field guns)
    • 4th Self-propelled Company (75/18 self-propelled guns)
    • 10th Armored Car Squadron (AB 41 armored cars)
  • Tactical Group "Alcamo-Partinico", in the area of Alcamo and Partinico
    • 171st CC.NN. Legion "Vespri"/ 28th Infantry Division "Aosta"
      • CLXVIII CC.NN. Battalion
      • CLXXI CC.NN. Battalion
      • 171st CC.NN. Machine Gun Company
    • I Group/ 22nd Artillery Regiment "Aosta" (75/27 field guns)
  • Tactical Group "Inchiapparo-Casale", in the area of Inchiapparo and Casale
    • LI Bersaglieri Battalion
    • 82nd Anti-tank Battery (75/39 anti-tank guns)
  • Tactical Group "Campobello-Ravanusa", in the area of Campobello di Licata and Ravanusa
    • I Squadrons Group/ Regiment "Cavalleggeri di Palermo"
    • XVII CC.NN. Battalion/ 17th CC.NN. Legion "Cremona"/ 26th Infantry Division "Assietta"
    • 259th Machine Gun Company/ 17th CC.NN. Legion "Cremona"/ 26th Infantry Division "Assietta"
Mobile Groups[edit]

Mobile groups were fully motorized battle groups created from corps assets and detached units of the army corps's two infantry divisions. The groups were deployed near the beaches most likely to be used by the allies.[32]

  • Mobile Group "A", in Paceco - Lieutenant Colonel Renato Perrone
    • Headquarters Company/ XII Tank Battalion "L"
    • 1st Company/ CXXXIII Self-propelled Anti-tank Battalion (47/32 L40 self-propelled guns)
    • 4th Company/ CII Tank Battalion (R35 tanks)
    • 3rd Company/ CDXLVIII Motorized Coastal Battalion
    • 2nd Battery/ CX Motorized Artillery Group (75/27 field guns)
    • 2nd Section/ 328th Anti-aircraft Battery/ 22nd Artillery Regiment "Aosta" (20/65 anti-aircraft guns)
  • Mobile Group "B", in Santa Ninfa - Lieutenant Colonel Vito Gaetano Mascio
    • Headquarters Company/ CXXXIII Self-propelled Anti-tank Battalion
    • 3rd Company/ CXXXIII Self-propelled Anti-tank Battalion (47/32 self-propelled guns)
    • 6th Company/ CII Tank Battalion (R35 tanks)
    • 1st and 2nd companies/ CDXLVIII Motorized Coastal Battalion
    • 161st Bersaglieri Motorcyclists Company
    • 6th Battery/ CCXXXIII Motorized Artillery Group (75/27 field guns)
    • 2nd Section/ 10th Anti-aircraft Battery/ 25th Artillery Regiment "Assietta" (20/65 anti-aircraft guns)
  • Mobile Group "C", in Portella Misilbesi - Lieutenant Colonel Osvaldo Mazzei
    • Headquarters Company/ CII Tank Battalion
    • 2nd Company/ CXXXIII Self-propelled Anti-tank Battalion (47/32 self-propelled guns)
    • 5th Company/ CII Tank Battalion (R35 tanks)
    • 4th Company/ CDXLVIII Motorized Coastal Battalion
    • 104th Anti-tank company (47/32 anti-tank guns)
    • 10th Battery/ IV Group/ 25th Artillery Regiment "Assietta" (75/27 field guns)
    • 4th Section/ 326th Anti-aircraft Battery/ 25th Artillery Regiment "Assietta" (20/65 anti-aircraft guns)
XII Army Corps Reserve[edit]

The 26th Infantry Division "Assietta" had been transferred from its bases and recruiting area in eastern Piedmont to Sicily in August 1941. The division's pre-deployment headquarters were in Asti, while's its two infantry regiments had been based in Asti (29th) and Tortona (30th), with the division's artillery regiment also based at Asti.

  • 26th Infantry Division "Assietta" - Generale di Divisione Francesco Scotti, from 26 July: Generale di Brigata Ottorino Schreiber
    • 29th Infantry Regiment "Assietta"
    • 30th Infantry Regiment "Assietta"
      • 3x Fusilier battalions
      • Support Weapons Company (65/17 infantry support guns)
      • Mortar Company (81mm Mod. 35 mortars)
    • 17th CC.NN. Legion "Cremona"
      • XVII CC.NN. Battalion (detached to Tactical Group "Campobello-Ravanusa")
      • XVIII CC.NN. Battalion
      • 259th CC.NN. Machine Gun Company (detached to Tactical Group "Campobello-Ravanusa")
    • 25th Artillery Regiment "Assietta"
      • I Artillery Group (100/17 howitzers; detached to XXIX Coastal Brigade)
      • II Artillery Group (100/17 howitzers)
      • III Artillery Group (75/27 field guns)
      • IV Artillery Group (75/27 field guns; 10th Battery detached to Mobile Group "C")
      • 10th Anti-aircraft Battery (20/65 anti-aircraft guns; 2nd Section detached to Mobile Group "B")
      • 326th Anti-aircraft Battery (20/65 anti-aircraft guns; 4th Sections detached to Mobile Group "C")
    • XXVI Mortar Battalion (81mm Mod. 35 mortars)
    • CXXVI Machine Gun Battalion
    • CCXXXIII Motorized Artillery Group (75/27 field guns; 6th Battery detached to Mobile Group "C")
    • Mixed Engineer Battalion
    • 50th Bersaglieri Motorcyclists Company (attached)
    • 126th Anti-tank Company (47/32 anti-tank guns)
    • Division Services

The 28th Infantry Division "Aosta" was one of three divisions, which recruited in Sicily. It mainly drafted men from western Sicily and had its peacetime headquarters in Palermo. It's two infantry regiments were based in Trapani (5th) and Palermo (6th), where also the division's artillery regiment was based.

  • 28th Infantry Division "Aosta" - Generale di Divisione Giuseppe Romano
    • 5th Infantry Regiment "Aosta"
    • 6th Infantry Regiment "Aosta"
      • 3x Fusilier battalions
      • Support Weapons Company (65/17 infantry support guns)
      • Mortar Company (81mm Mod. 35 mortars)
    • 171st CC.NN. Legion "Vespri" (detached as Tactical Group "Alcamo-Partinico")
      • CLXVIII CC.NN. Battalion
      • CLXXI CC.NN. Battalion
      • 171st CC.NN. Machine Gun Company
    • 22nd Artillery Regiment "Aosta"
      • I Artillery Group (75/27 field guns; detached to Tactical Group "Alcamo-Partinico")
      • II Artillery Group (75/27 howitzers)
      • III Motorized Group (75/18 Mod. 35 field guns)
      • IV Artillery Group (75/13 mountain guns)
      • 328th Anti-aircraft Battery (20/65 anti-aircraft guns; 2nd Section detached to Mobile Group "A")
      • 365th Anti-aircraft Battery (20/65 anti-aircraft guns)
    • XXVIII Mortar Battalion (81mm Mod. 35 mortars)
    • CXXVIII Mixed Engineer Battalion
    • 28th Anti-tank Company (47/32 anti-tank guns)
    • Division Services
Italian XVI Army Corps[edit]
  • XVI Army Corps, in Piazza Armerina - Generale di Corpo d'Armata Carlo Rossi - responsible for Sicily to the East of a line from Cefalù to Gela[30]
    • 40th Army Corps Artillery Grouping, in Piazza Armerina
      • X Motorized Artillery Group (105/28 howitzers)
      • XVI Motorized Artillery Group (105/28 howitzers)
      • XXIX Motorized Artillery Group (105/28 howitzers)
      • CIX Motorized Artillery Group (149/13 howitzers)
      • CX Heavy Artillery Group (149/13 howitzers)
    • 16th Army Corps Engineer Grouping
    • LVIII Bersaglieri Battalion
    • XII Army Corps Machine Gun Battalion
    • CCXXXIII Self-propelled Anti-tank Battalion (47/32 L40 self-propelled guns)
    • XI Anti-aircraft Artillery Group (75/46 anti-aircraft guns)
    • 1x Engineer battalion
    • Army Corps Services
Coastal Troops Command[edit]
  • Coastal Troops Command - Generale di Divisione Achille d'Havet
    • 206th Coastal Division, in Modica - Generale di Divisione Achille d'Havet - responsible for the coast from Punta Braccetto in Santa Croce Camerina to Arenella to the South of Syracuse
      • 122nd Coastal Regiment
        • CCXLIII Coastal Battalion
        • CCCLXXV Coastal Battalion
      • 123rd Coastal Regiment
        • CCCLXXXI Coastal Battalion
        • CCCLXXXIII Coastal Battalion
        • DXLII Coastal Battalion
      • 146th Coastal Regiment
        • CCCLXXIV Coastal Battalion
        • CDXXX Coastal Battalion
        • CDXXXVII Coastal Battalion
      • 44th Coastal Artillery Grouping
        • CII Coastal Artillery Group (75/27 field guns)
        • CLXI Coastal Artillery Group (149/35 heavy guns)
        • CLXIV Coastal Artillery Group (149/35 heavy guns)
        • CCIX Coastal Artillery Group (100/22 howitzers)
        • CCXXIV Coastal Artillery Group (100/22 howitzers)
        • 227th Coastal Artillery Battery (105/14 howitzers)
      • DXLII Mobile Territorial Bersaglieri Battalion (attached, 2nd Company detached to Mobile Group "F")
      • CIV Static Machine Gun Battalion
      • CCXX Self-propelled Anti-tank Battalion (attached; 47/32 L40 self-propelled guns)
      • 122nd Engineer Platoon
      • 2x Anti-paratrooper units
      • Division Services
    • 213th Coastal Division, Generale di Brigata Carlo Gotti - responsible for the coast from Punta Castelluccio in Agnone Bagni to Moleti south of Messina
      • 135th Coastal Regiment
        • XII Coastal Battalion
        • CII Coastal Battalion
        • CCCLXIX Coastal Battalion
      • CCCLXXII Coastal Battalion
      • 21st Coastal Artillery Grouping
        • XXX Coastal Artillery Group (105/28 howitzers)
        • XC Coastal Artillery Group (2x 149/19 and 2x 149/35 heavy gun batteries)
        • CXLIV Coastal Artillery Group (105/14 howitzers)
        • CCXXX Coastal Artillery Group (100/22 howitzers)
      • CLIII Static Machine Gun Battalion
      • Division Services
    • XVIII Coastal Brigade, in Niscemi Generale di Brigata Orazio Mariscalco - responsible for the coast from Punta Due Rocche to the East of Licata to Punta Braccetto in Santa Croce Camerina
      • 134th Coastal Regiment
        • CDXXIX Coastal Battalion
        • CCCLXXXIV Coastal Battalion
      • 178th Coastal Regiment
        • DI Coastal Battalion (4th Company detached to Mobile Group "E")
        • CCCLXXXIX Coastal Battalion
      • 60th Coastal Artillery Grouping
        • XXI Coastal Artillery Group (2x 75/27 field gun and 2x 75/34 anti-tank gun batteries)
        • LXXXI Coastal Artillery Group (75/32 field guns)
        • CLXII Coastal Artillery Group (149/35 heavy guns)
        • CCIX Coastal Artillery Group (100/22 howitzers)
      • 81st Artillery Battery (75/34 anti-tank guns)
      • 106th Mortar Company (81mm Mod. 35 mortars)
      • 426th Mortar Company (81mm Mod. 35 mortars)
      • 268th Anti-tank Company (47/32 anti-tank guns)
      • 288th Artillery Battery (155/36 guns)
      • 455th, 456th, 526th, and 332nd Anti-paratrooper units
      • Brigade Services
    • XIX Coastal Brigade, Generale di Brigata Giovanni Bocchetti - responsible for the coast from the West of Messina to, but excluding, Cefalù
      • 140th Coastal Regiment
        • CI Coastal Battalion
        • CDXLVII Coastal Battalion
      • 179th Coastal Regiment
        • CDXXXV Coastal Battalion
        • D Coastal Battalion
      • 61st Coastal Artillery Grouping
        • Coastal Artillery Group (4x batteries of 75/27 field guns)
        • Coastal Artillery Group (4x batteries of 122/45 howitzers)
        • 128th Coastal Artillery Battery (105/28 howitzers)
      • XV Anti-tank battalion (attached; 47/32 anti-tank guns)
      • 52nd Bersaglieri Motorcyclists Company (attached)
      • 104th Mortar Company (81mm Mod. 35 mortars)
      • 413th Static Mortar Company (81mm Mod. 35 mortars)
      • Brigade Services
    • Harbor Defense Command "H", in Catania - Generale di Brigata Azzo Passalacqua[31]
      • CDXXXIV Coastal Battalion
      • CDLXXVII Coastal Battalion
      • XXVI Coastal Artillery Group (75/27 field guns)
      • 105th Mortar Company (81mm Mod. 35 mortars)
Tactical Groups[edit]

Tactical groups were created from corps assets and detached units of the army corps's two infantry divisions. The groups were deployed near the beaches most likely to be used by the allies.

  • Tactical Group "Barcellona", in Barcellona Pozzo di Gotto
    • Headquarters Company/ CIII Anti-tank Battalion
    • 2nd Company/ CIII Anti-tank Battalion (47/32 anti-tank guns)
    • 7th Bersaglieri Motorcyclists Company
    • 12th Battery/ IV Group/ 54th Artillery Regiment "Napoli" (75/18 field guns)
    • Arditi Platoon/ CDXLVII Coastal Battalion
  • Tactical Group "Carmito", in Carmito
  • Tactical Group "Comiso-Ispica", in the area of Comiso and Ispica - Colonel Busalacchi
    • CLXXIII CC.NN. Battalion
    • I Group/ 54th Artillery Regiment "Napoli" (100/17 howitzers)
    • 174th CC.NN. Machine Gun Company
    • 2nd Company/ LIV Mortar Battalion/ 54th Infantry Division "Napoli" (81mm Mod. 35 mortars)
    • 1x Anti-Tank platoon (47mm/32)
  • Tactical Group "Linguaglossa", in Linguaglossa
    • LVII Bersaglieri Battalion
    • 54th Bersaglieri Motorcyclists Company
    • 11th Battery/ IV Group/ 54th Artillery Regiment "Napoli" (75/18 Mod. 35 field guns)
Mobile Groups[edit]

Mobile groups were fully motorized battle groups created from corps assets and detached units of the army corps's two infantry divisions. The groups were deployed near the beaches most likely to be used by the allies.[33]

  • Mobile Group "D", in Misterbianco - Lieutenant Colonel Massimino D'Andretta
    • Headquarters Company/ CI Tank Battalion
    • 3rd Company/ CI Tank Battalion (R35 tanks)
    • 2nd Bersaglieri Motorcyclists Company
    • 7th Company/ II Fusilier Battalion/ 76th Infantry Regiment "Napoli"
    • 1st Company/ CIII Anti-tank Battalion (47/32 anti-tank guns)
    • 10th Battery/ IV Group/ 54th Artillery Regiment "Napoli" (75/18 Mod. 35 field guns)
    • 1st Section/ 354th Anti-aircraft Battery/ 54th Infantry Division "Napoli" (20/65 anti-aircraft guns)
  • Mobile Group "E", in Niscemi - Captain Giuseppe Granieri (destroyed in the Battle of Gela)
    • 1st Company/ CI Tank Battalion (R35 tanks)
    • 2nd Company/ CII Anti-tank Battalion (47/32 anti-tank guns)
    • 155th Bersaglieri Motorcyclists Company
    • 4th Company/ DI Coastal Battalion/ XVIII Coastal Brigade
    • 9th Battery/ III Group/ 54th Artillery Regiment "Napoli" (75/18 field guns)
    • 1st Section/ 21st Anti-aircraft Battery/ 54th Infantry Division "Napoli" (20/65 anti-aircraft guns)
  • Mobile Group "F", in Rosolini
    • Headquarters Company/ CII Anti-tank Battalion
    • 2nd Company/ CI Tank Battalion (R35 tanks, 1x platoon detached to Mobile Group "G")
    • 3rd Bersaglieri Motorcyclists Company
    • 2nd Company/ DXLII Mobile Territorial Bersaglieri Battalion
    • 1st Company/ CII Anti-tank Battalion (47/32 anti-tank guns)
    • 2nd Battery/ CXXVI Motorized Artillery Group (75/27 field guns)
  • Mobile Group "G", in Comiso - Lieutenant Colonel Porcù
    • CLXIX CC.NN. Battalion/ 173rd CC.NN. Legion "Salso"/ 54th Infantry Division "Napoli"
    • 3rd Company/ CII Anti-tank Battalion (47/32 anti-tank guns)
    • 8th Battery/ III Group/ 54th Artillery Regiment "Napoli" (75/18 field guns)
    • 1x Platoon/ 2nd Company/ CI Tank Battalion (R35 tanks)
  • Mobile Group "H", in Caltagirone - Lieutenant Colonel Luigi Cixi
    • Headquarters Company/ 131st Tank Infantry Regiment
    • 2nd Tank Company (9x Fiat 3000 tanks)
    • 3rd Company/ CIII Anti-tank Battalion (47/32 anti-tank guns)
    • 7th Battery/ III Group/ 54th Artillery Regiment "Napoli" (75/18 field guns)
    • 1x Platoon/ Mortar Company/ 76th Infantry Regiment "Napoli" (81mm Mod. 35 mortars)
XVI Army Corps Reserve[edit]

The 4th Infantry Division "Livorno" had been transferred from its bases and recruiting area in southern Piedmont to Sicily in February 1943. Initially intended as reinforcement for Army Group Africa fighting in Tunisia, the Army Group's disastrous situation and retreat to Tunis prevented the division's transfer to Tunisia. The division's pre-deployment headquarters were in Cuneo, while's its two infantry regiments had been based in Cuneo (33rd) and Fossano (34th), where also the division's artillery regiment had been based.

  • 4th Infantry Division "Livorno" - Generale di Divisione Domenico Chirieleison
    • 33rd Infantry Regiment "Livorno"
    • 34th Infantry Regiment "Livorno"[citation needed]
      • 3x Fusilier battalions (2x motorized)[31]
      • Support Weapons Company (65/17 infantry support guns)
      • Mortar Company (81mm Mod. 35 mortars)
    • 185th Paratroopers Regiment "Nembo" (attached from 3 to 13 August 1943)
      • III Paratroopers Battalion
      • VIII Paratroopers Battalion
      • XI Paratroopers Battalion
      • Cannons Company (47/32 anti-tank guns)
    • 28th Artillery Regiment "Livorno"
      • I Motorized Group (100/17 howitzers)
      • II Motorized Group (100/17 howitzers)
      • III Motorized Group (75/18 Mod. 35 field guns)
      • IV Motorized Group (75/18 field guns)
      • 78th Anti-aircraft Battery (20/65 anti-aircraft guns)
      • 2x Anti-aircraft batteries (20/65 anti-aircraft guns)
    • IV Self-propelled Anti-tank Battalion (47/32 L40 self-propelled guns; detached to Tactical Group "Carmito")[31]
    • IV Mortar Battalion (81mm Mod. 35 mortars)
    • IV Motorized Engineer Battalion
    • XI Sapper Battalion (attached)
    • 4th Anti-tank Company (47/32 anti-tank guns)
    • Division Services

The 54th Infantry Division "Napoli" was one of three divisions, which recruited in Sicily. It mainly drafted men from southern Sicily and had its peacetime headquarters in Caltanissetta. It's two infantry regiments were based in Syracuse (75th) and Agrigento (76th), while the division's artillery regiment was based in Caltanissetta.

  • 54th Infantry Division "Napoli",[31] Generale di Divisione Giulio Cesare Gotti Porcinari
    • 75th Infantry Regiment "Napoli"
      • 3x Fusilier battalions
      • Support Weapons Company (47/32 anti-tank guns)
      • Mortar Company (81mm Mod. 35 mortars)
    • 76th Infantry Regiment "Napoli"
      • 3x Fusilier battalions (7th Company/ II Fusilier Battalion detached to Mobile Group "D")
      • Support Weapons Company (47/32 anti-tank guns)
      • Mortar Company (81mm Mod. 35 mortars; one platoon detached to Mobile Group "H")
    • 173rd CC.NN. Legion "Salso"
      • CLXIX CC.NN. Battalion (detached to Mobile Group "G")
      • CLXXIII CC.NN. Battalion (detached to Tactical Group "Comiso-Ispica")
      • 174th CC.NN. Machine Gun Company (detached to Tactical Group "Comiso-Ispica")
    • 54th Artillery Regiment "Napoli"
      • I Group (100/17 howitzers, detached to Tactical Group "Comiso-Ispica")
      • II Group (75/27 field guns)
      • III Motorized Group ((75/18 Mod. 35 field guns; all batteries detached to tactical and mobile groups)
      • IV Motorized Group (75/18 field guns; all batteries detached to mobile groups)
      • 21st Anti-aircraft Battery (20/65 anti-aircraft guns; 1st Section detached to Mobile Group "E")
      • 354th Anti-aircraft Battery (20/65 anti-aircraft guns; 1st Section detached to Mobile Group "D")
    • LIV Machine Gun Battalion (81mm Mod. 35 mortars)
    • LIV Mortar Battalion (81mm Mod. 35 mortars, 2nd Company detached to Tactical Group "Comiso-Ispica")
    • CXXVI Motorized Artillery Group (75/27 field guns, 2nd Battery detached to Mobile Group "F")
    • LIV Engineer Battalion
    • 54th Anti-tank Company (47/32 anti-tank guns)
    • Division Services
German XIV Panzer Corps[edit]

The XIV Panzer Corps was activated 18 July 1943[34] to take command of the 15th Panzergrenadier Division, the Hermann Göring Division, the newly arrived 1st Parachute Division and the 29th Panzergrenadier Division which started to arrive in Sicily on 18 July. The commanding general was General der Panzertruppe Hans-Valentin Hube.

  • German XIV Panzer Corps, General der Panzertruppe Hans-Valentin Hube
    • 382nd Panzergrenadier Regiment (reinforcements, arrived 11 July)
      • 2x battalions (a third battalion remained in Naples)
    • 904th Fortress Battalion
    • 923rd Fortress Battalion
    • 926th Fortress Battalion
    • 4th Battery/ I Battalion/ 71st Werfer Regiment (15 cm Nebelwerfer 41 and 21 cm Nebelwerfer 42)
  • Panzer Division "Hermann Göring" - Generalleutnant Paul Conrath (attached to XVI Italian Army Corps until the activation of XIV Panzer Corps on 18 July)[35]
    • Panzer Regiment "Hermann Göring"
    • 1st Panzergrenadier Regiment "Hermann Göring"
      • 3x battalions
    • 2nd Panzergrenadier Regiment "Hermann Göring"
      • 3x battalions
    • Panzer Artillery Regiment "Hermann Göring"
    • Anti-aircraft Regiment "Hermann Göring"
      • I Battalion (3x 8.8 cm Flak and 2x 2 cm Flak batteries)
      • II Battalion (3x 8.8 cm Flak and 4x 2 cm Flak batteries; reinforcements arriving 30 July)
    • Panzer Reconnaissance Battalion "Hermann Göring"
    • Panzer Engineer Battalion "Hermann Göring"
    • Panzer Signal Battalion "Hermann Göring"
    • Replacement Battalion "Hermann Göring"
    • 2nd Company/ 504th Heavy Tank Battalion (17x Tiger I)
    • Division Services
  • 15th Panzergrenadier Division - Generalmajor Eberhard Rodt (one third of the division (a reinforced infantry group) was attached to the XVI Italian Army Corps and the rest to the XII Italian Army Corps until the activation of XIV Panzer Corps on 18 July)[35]
    • 104th Panzergrenadier Regiment
      • 2x battalions
    • 115th Panzergrenadier Regiment
      • 2x battalions
    • 129th Panzergrenadier Regiment
      • 3x battalions
    • 33rd Motorized Artillery Regiment
      • I Battalion (3x 10.5 cm leFH 18 batteries)
      • II Battalion (3x 17 cm Kanone 18 batteries; former 557th Heavy Artillery Battalion)
      • III Battalion (2x 10.5 cm leFH 18 and 1x mortar batteries)
      • IV Battalion (3x 10.5 cm leFH 18 batteries)
    • Panzergrenadier Battalion "Reggio", in Reggio Calabria
    • 215th Panzer Battalion (6x Panzer III, 46x Panzer IV)
    • 33rd Engineer Battalion
    • 315th Anti-aircraft Battalion (2x 8.8 cm Flak, 1x 3.7 cm Flak and 1x 2 cm Flak batteries)
    • 999th Signal Battalion
    • Division Services
  • 1st Fallschirmjäger Division - Generalleutnant Richard Heidrich (commenced arriving by air on 12 July; the 1st Fallschirmjäger Regiment was held in reserve at Naples)[36]
    • 3rd Fallschirmjäger Regiment
      • 3x battalions
      • 13th Mortar Company
      • 14th Anti-tank Company
    • 4th Fallschirmjäger Regiment
      • 3x battalions
      • 13th Mortar Company
      • 14th Anti-tank Company
    • 1st Parachute Artillery Regiment
      • I Battalion (3x batteries 7.5 cm GebG 36)
      • II Battalion (3x batteries 7.5 cm GebG 36; with the 1st Fallschirmjäger Regiment at Naples)
    • 1st Parachute Machine Gun Battalion
    • 1st Parachute Panzerjäger Battalion (7.5 cm Pak 40 anti-tank guns)
    • 1st Parachute Engineer Battalion
    • 1st Parachute Signal Battalion
    • Division Services
  • 29th Panzergrenadier Division - Generalmajor Walter Fries (commenced arriving in Sicily on 18 July)[37]
    • 15th Panzergrenadier Regiment
    • 71st Panzergrenadier Regiment
      • 3x battalions
      • 13th Company (6x sIG Grille)
      • 14th Anti-tank Company (3x 7.5 cm Pak 40, 6x 5 cm Pak 38)
    • 29th Artillery Regiment
      • I Self-propelled Battalion (18x le.F.H. Wespe)
      • II Battalion
      • III Battalion
    • 129th Panzer Battalion (43x StuG III, 3x Panzer III K)
    • 129th Panzer Reconnaissance Battalion (remained in Southern Italy)
    • 29th Engineer Battalion
    • 313th Anti-aircraft Battalion (2x 8.8 cm Flak and 1x 3.7 cm Flak batteries)
    • 29th Signal Battalion
    • Division Services
Territorial Defense Command Palermo[edit]

The Territorial Defense Command was tasked with rear area security duties, the training of recruits, and the formation of units.

  • Territorial Defense Command Palermo, in Palermo
    • 25th Military Zone, in Palermo
      • Infantry Complementary Officer Recruits School
      • 185th Coastal Regiment (activated on 20 May 1943)[38]
      • 186th Coastal Regiment (activated on 01 June 1943 - not fully mobilized)[38]
      • 188th Coastal Regiment (activated on 15 June 1943 - not fully mobilized)[38]
      • 189th Coastal Regiment (activated on 15 June 1943 - not fully mobilized)[38]
      • Territorial Carabinieri Legion "Palermo"
      • 13th CC.NN. Railway Legion (rail transport police)
      • 22nd CC.NN. Anti-aircraft Legion
        • See Territorial Anti-aircraft Defense section for details
      • 5th CC.NN. Road Units Group (traffic police)
      • I CC.NN. Forestry Battalion (forest/environmental police)
      • CCCLXVIII Mobile Territorial CC.NN. Battalion
      • CCCLXX Territorial CC.NN. Battalion
      • CCCLXXI Territorial CC.NN. Battalion
      • CCCLXXII Territorial CC.NN. Battalion
      • 58th, 59th, 67th, 68th, 72nd, 73rd, and 74th Coastal CC.NN. companies
      • 4x Coastal artillery batteries
      • 28th Infantry Division "Aosta" Depot, in Palermo
      • 54th Infantry Division "Napoli" Depot, in Caltanissetta
    • 26th Military Zone, in Messina
      • Territorial Carabinieri Legion "Messina"
      • DLXVII Mobile Territorial CC.NN. Battalion
      • CCCLXXIII Territorial CC.NN. Battalion
      • 75th Coastal CC.NN. Company
      • 29th Infantry Division "Piemonte" Depot, in Messina

The 29th Infantry Division "Piemonte" was one of three infantry divisions, which recruited in Sicily. It mainly drafted men from eastern Sicily and had its peacetime headquarters in Messina. It's two infantry regiments were based in Messina (3rd) and Catania (4th), with the division's artillery regiment based also in Messina. In September 1940 the division was transferred to Albania and remained in the Balkans and Greece until it disbanded after the Italian-Allied Armistice of Cassibile.

Maritime Military Command Sicily[edit]

Military harbors in Sicily were under command of the Royal Italian Navy's Maritime Military Command Sicily (Italian: Comando Militare Marittimo in Sicilia) in Messina, which fell under Armed Forces Command Sicily. The command's commanding officer was Ammiraglio di Squadra Pietro Barone and a large majority of its units were Royal Italian Army and CC.NN. units. The only naval units in Sicily in July 1943 were twenty torpedo boats of the 3rd and 7th torpedo boat squadrons.

Besides the three major commands listed below the Royal Italian Navy was also present with administrative Navy Commands in Catania, Palermo, and Porto Empedocle.[39]

Maritime Military Base Messina-Reggio Calabria[edit]
  • Maritime Military Base Messina-Reggio Calabria, in Messina[31] - Ammiraglio di Squadra Pietro Barone
    • 116th Coastal Regiment, in Reggio Calabria
      • CLVI Coastal Battalion
      • DII Coastal Battalion
    • 119th Coastal Regiment
      • CCCLXX Coastal Battalion
      • CCCLXXI Coastal Battalion
      • CDXLII Coastal Battalion
      • DIII Coastal Battalion
    • 95th CC.NN. Legion "Marzocco"
      • XCIII CC.NN. Battalion
      • XCV CC.NN. Battalion
      • 93rd CC.NN. Machine Gun Company
    • DLXIII Mobile Territorial CC.NN. Battalion (from the 163rd CC.NN. Legion "Tommaso Gulli" in Reggio Calabria)
    • DLXVI Mobile Territorial CC.NN. Battalion
    • XIII Dismounted Squadrons Group/ Regiment "Cavalleggeri di Palermo"
    • CCLV Coastal Artillery Battalion, in Reggio Calabria (100/22 howitzers)
    • CLVIII Coastal Artillery Battalion (149/19 heavy guns)
6th CC.NN. Maritime Artillery Legion[edit]
  • 6th CC.NN. Maritime Artillery Legion, in Messina[40]
    • 50th, 51st, 52nd, 53rd, 54th, and 55th Coastal CC.NN. companies
    • Sicilian Command Group North, in Fort Menaja
      • Coastal Artillery Battery "Masotto" (6x 280/9 coastal defense howitzers)
      • Coastal Artillery Battery "Spartà" (3x 152/45 naval guns and 1x 120/40 naval gun)
      • Coastal Artillery Battery "Mezzacapo" (4x 120/50 naval guns)
      • Artillery Battery "RE 198" (4x 105/28 field guns; Royal Italian Army)
      • Searchlights at Pace del Mela and Torre Faro; optical telegraph at Fort Spuria; reconnaissance station at Piano del Giglio
      • Anti-aircraft Command Group North, at Tremonti
        • Dual-role Battery "MS 123" (4x 90/42 naval/anti-aircraft guns)
        • Dual-role Battery "MS 400" (4x 76/40 naval/anti-aircraft guns)
        • Anti-aircraft Battery "MS 475" (4x 90/53 anti-aircraft guns)
        • Anti-aircraft Battery "MS 577" (4x 76/40 anti-aircraft guns)
        • Anti-aircraft Battery "MS 724" (4x 90/53 anti-aircraft guns)
        • Anti-aircraft Battery "MS 949" (4x 90/53 anti-aircraft guns)
    • Sicilian Command Group South, in Puntale Cappellaro
      • Coastal Artillery Battery "Cavalli" (6x 280/9 coastal defense howitzers)
      • Coastal Artillery Battery "Margottini" (3x 152/45 naval guns and 1x 120/40 naval gun)[41]
      • Coastal Artillery Battery "De Cristofaro" (4x 120/40 naval guns)
      • Artillery Battery "RE 199" (4x 105/28 field guns; Royal Italian Army)
      • Searchlight at Tremestieri
      • Anti-aircraft Command Group South, at Montepiselli
        • Dual-role Battery "MS 3" (4x 76/40 naval/anti-aircraft guns)
        • Dual-role Battery "MS 280" (4x 90/53 naval/anti-aircraft guns)
        • Dual-role Battery "MS 525" (4x 90/42 naval/anti-aircraft guns)
        • Dual-role Battery "MS 611" (4x 76/40 naval/anti-aircraft guns)

After the allies had landed on Sicily the Maritime Military Base Messina-Reggio Calabria was reinforced with every available anti-aircraft battery to protect the vital supply route over the Strait of Messina. Until the end of July the following anti-aircraft units had reached Messina:[42]

  • Anti-aircraft Battery "MS 120" (4x 90/53 anti-aircraft guns)
  • Dual-role Battery "MS 159" (4x 90/42 naval/anti-aircraft guns)
  • Anti-aircraft Battery "MS 253" (4x 76/40 anti-aircraft guns)
  • Anti-aircraft Battery "MS 277" (4x 90/53 anti-aircraft guns)
  • Anti-aircraft Battery "MS 328" (4x 90/53 anti-aircraft guns)
  • Anti-aircraft Battery "RE 344" (8x 37/54 anti-aircraft guns; Royal Italian Army)
  • Anti-aircraft Battery "MS 349" (4x 90/53 anti-aircraft guns)
  • Anti-aircraft Battery "MS 434" (4x 90/53 anti-aircraft guns)
  • Anti-aircraft Battery "MS 477" (4x 76/40 anti-aircraft guns)
  • Anti-aircraft Battery "MS 553" (8x 37/54 anti-aircraft guns)
  • Dual-role Battery "MS 620" (4x 90/53 naval/anti-aircraft guns)
  • Dual-role Battery "MS 713" (4x 76/40 naval/anti-aircraft guns)
  • Anti-aircraft Battery "MS 807" (4x 90/53 anti-aircraft guns)
  • Anti-aircraft Battery "MS 881" (4x 90/53 anti-aircraft guns)
  • Anti-aircraft Battery "MS 905" (4x 76/40 anti-aircraft guns)
  • Anti-aircraft Battery "MS 940" (4x 90/53 anti-aircraft guns)

Additionally the German Army's 281st Flak Battalion had been transferred to Messina with eight 8.8 cm Flak and six smaller caliber anti-aircraft batteries. After arriving in Messina the 281st Battalion was renamed "Flak Subgroup Messina". Retreating Italian army troops brought a further three 75/46 and six 90/53 anti-aircraft batteries to Messina. On 2 August the retreating 22nd Flak Brigade of the Luftwaffe arrived in Messina and took command of all Axis air-defense units.

14th CC.NN. Maritime Artillery Legion[edit]
  • 14th CC.NN. Maritime Artillery Legion, in Reggio Calabria[40]
    • Calabrian Command Group North, at Fort Siacci
      • Coastal Artillery Battery "Beleno" (6x 280/9 coastal defense howitzers)
      • Artillery Battery "RE 196" (4x 105/28 field guns; Royal Italian Army)
      • Searchlights at Scilla, Santa Trada, and Punta Pezzo
    • Calabrian Command Group South, in Pentimele Sud
      • Coastal Artillery Battery "Pellizzari" (4x 280/9 coastal defense howitzers)
      • Coastal Artillery Battery "Conteduca" (4x 152/50 and 1x 120/40 naval guns)
      • Artillery Battery "RE 197" (4x 105/28 field guns; Royal Italian Army)
      • Searchlights at Catona and Pentimele; reconnaissance Station at Torre Lupo
      • Anti-aircraft Command Group Reggio Calabria:
        • Dual-role Battery "MS 110" (4x 90/42 naval/anti-aircraft guns)
        • Anti-aircraft Battery "MS 116" (4x 90/53 anti-aircraft guns)
        • Dual-role Battery "MS 268" (4x 90/53 naval/anti-aircraft guns)
        • Anti-aircraft Battery "MS 374" (4x 76/40 anti-aircraft guns)
        • Anti-aircraft Battery "MS 430" (4x 90/53 anti-aircraft guns)
        • Dual-role Battery "MS 643" (4x 90/53 naval/anti-aircraft guns)
        • Dual-role Battery "MS 819" (4x 90/53 naval/anti-aircraft guns)

Additionally the Luftwaffe's 182nd Heavy Flak Battalion had been transferred to Reggio Calabria with eight 8.8 cm Flak, four 10.5 cm Flak, and five smaller caliber anti-aircraft batteries. After arriving in Reggio Calabria the 182nd Battalion was renamed "Flak Subgroup Reggio-San Giovanni". The Germans also deployed four 17 cm cannon batteries as mobile coastal batteries on the Calabrian side of the strait. On 2 August the retreating 22nd Flak Brigade of the Luftwaffe arrived in Messina and took command of all Axis air-defense units.

Maritime Military Sector Augusta-Syracuse[edit]
"Lamba Doria" battery 152/50 cannon

The Maritime Military Sector Augusta-Syracuse was responsible for the harbors of Augusta and Syracuse, and the coast between Arenella (206th Coastal Division) to the South and Punta Castelluccio in Agnone Bagni (213th Coastal Division) to the North.[43]

  • Maritime Military Sector Augusta-Syracuse, in Augusta[31] - Ammiraglio di Divisione Priamo Leonardi
    • 121st Coastal Regiment
      • CCXLVI Coastal Battalion, in Augusta
      • CCCLXXXV Coastal Battalion, in Syracuse
      • DIV Coastal Battalion, between Augusta and Melilli
      • DXL Coastal Battalion, between Belvedere and Grottone
      • 80th Artillery Battery
      • 5x Blockposts
    • CCCLXIX Territorial CC.NN. Battalion
    • I Protection Battalion (Royal Italian Air Force unit at Seaplane Base Syracuse)
    • 1x Royal Italian Navy battalion
    • 5x Anti-paratrooper units
7th CC.NN. Maritime Artillery Legion[edit]
  • 7th CC.NN. Maritime Artillery Legion[43][44]
    • 60th, and 63rd Coastal CC.NN. companies
    • Augusta Sector[43][44]
      • Coastal Artillery Battery "Luigi di Savoia" (2x 203/50 naval guns)
      • Coastal Artillery Battery "Biagio Assereto" (3x 152/50 and 1x 120/40 naval guns)
      • Coastal Artillery Battery "Bozzo Gravina"(3x 152/50 and 1x 120/40 naval guns)
      • Floating Battery "GM 216" (2x 190/45 naval guns, 2x 20/70 anti-aircraft guns)
      • Floating battery "GM 239"(2x 149/47 and 1x 76/40 naval guns, 2x 20/70 anti-aircraft guns)
      • Dual-role Battery "AS 269" (6x 102/35 naval/anti-aircraft guns)
      • Dual-role Battery "AS 360" (6x 76/40 naval/anti-aircraft guns)
      • Dual-role Battery "AS 361" (6x 102/35 naval/anti-aircraft guns)
      • Dual-role Battery "AS 362" (6x 102/35 naval/anti-aircraft guns)
      • Dual-role Battery "AS 363" (6x 76/40 naval/anti-aircraft guns)
      • Anti-aircraft Battery "AS 364" (6x 76/40 anti-aircraft guns)
      • Dual-role Battery "AS 383" (6x 102/35 naval/anti-aircraft guns)
      • Anti-aircraft Battery "AS 416" (6x 76/40 anti-aircraft guns)
      • Dual-role Battery "AS 561" (6x 102/35 naval/anti-aircraft guns)
      • Anti-aircraft Battery "AS 592" (6x 102/35 anti-aircraft guns)
      • Anti-aircraft Battery "AS 674" (6x 76/40 anti-aircraft guns)
      • Dual-role Battery "AS 741" (6x 76/40 naval/anti-aircraft guns)
      • Dual-role Battery "AS 896" (6x 76/40 naval/anti-aircraft guns)
    • Autonomous Group "Siracusa", in Syracuse[43][44]
      • Coastal Artillery Battery "Opera A" (2x 381/40 naval guns)
      • Coastal Artillery Battery "Emanuele Russo"(3x 152/50 and 1x 120/40 naval guns)
      • Coastal Artillery Battery "Lamba Doria"(3x 152/50 and 1x 120/40 naval guns)
      • Dual-role Battery "AS 309" (6x 76/40 naval/anti-aircraft guns)
      • Dual-role Battery "AS 365" (6x 76/40 naval/anti-aircraft guns)
      • Dual-role Battery "AS 493" (6x 102/35 naval/anti-aircraft guns)
      • Dual-role Battery "AS 671" (6x 76/40 naval/anti-aircraft guns)
      • Dual-role Battery "AS 909" (6x 76/40 naval/anti-aircraft guns)
Maritime Military Sector Trapani[edit]
  • Maritime Military Sector Trapani, in Trapani[31] - Rear Admiral Giuseppe Manfredi
    • 137th Coastal Regiment
      • CDXLIII Coastal Battalion
      • DV Coastal Battalion
      • DCCCXLIV Coastal Battalion
    • CCCLXXIV Territorial CC.NN. Battalion
    • 8th CC.NN. Maritime Artillery Legion
      • 9x Anti-ship artillery batteries (Royal Italian Navy)
      • 76th, 77th, 78th, 79th, 80th, 81st, and 82nd Coastal CC.NN. companies
    • Anti-aircraft Command Group Trapani:
      • 3x Anti-aircraft batteries (102/35 anti-aircraft guns; Royal Italian Navy)
      • 1x Anti-aircraft battery (90/53 anti-aircraft guns; Royal Italian Navy)
      • 5x Anti-aircraft batteries (76/40 anti-aircraft guns; Royal Italian Navy)
      • 1x Anti-aircraft battery (102/35 anti-aircraft guns; CC.NN.)
      • 2x Anti-aircraft batteries (90/53 anti-aircraft guns; CC.NN.)
      • 3x Anti-aircraft batteries (76/40 anti-aircraft guns; CC.NN.)
Armored Trains[edit]

The Royal Italian Navy fielded 14 armored trains, which were equipped with naval guns that had been removed from decommissioned ships. Ten of the trains were assigned to the Armed Forces Command Sicily before the allied landings, with eight trains being transferred to Sicily and two based on the Italian mainland near Reggio Calabria to provide fire for the defense of the Strait of Messina. The ten trains of the Armed Forces Command Sicily on 10 July 1943 were:[45]

The ten armored trains did not take part in any combat operation after the allied landings in Sicily, as the allies' absolute air supremacy prevent the trains from leaving their camouflaged shelters. The eight trains based in Sicily were blown up by their crews during the retreat from the island.[45]

Air Force Command Sicily[edit]

Airfields in Sicily were under command of the Royal Italian Air Force's Air Force Command Sicily, which fell under Armed Forces Command Sicily. The commanding officer was Generale di divisione aerea Adriano Monti.

Each airfield was garrisoned by two infantry companies, reinforced by two mortar squads with 81mm Mod. 35 mortars, and two artillery batteries with 149/12 howitzers.[31]

The airfields and units under command of Air Force Command Sicily on 10 July 1943, and the reinforcements, which arrived in Sicily on 10 and 11 July 1943, were:

Airfields without flying units:

3rd Air Fleet[edit]

Bombers and torpedo-bombers of 3rd Air Fleet entered combat in support of Air Force Command Sicily starting from 10 July 1943.

  • 3rd Air Fleet
    • Bomber Group, at Perugia Airfield
    • 51st Bomber Squadron, at Viterbo Airfield (Ju 88 A Alcione bombers)
        • 212th and 213th flights
      • 86th Bomber Squadron, at Perugia Airfield (Z.1007 Alcione bombers)
        • 190th and 191st flights
      • 88th Bomber Squadron, at Perugia Airfield (Z.1007 Alcione bombers)
        • 264th and 265th flights
      • 106th Bomber Squadron, at Perugia Airfield (Z.1007 Alcione bombers)
        • 260th and 261st flights
    • Torpedo-Bomber Group
      • 41st Torpedo-Bomber Squadron, at Siena Airfield (SM.79 Sparviero Sparviero torpedo-bombers)
        • 204th and 205th flights
      • 89th Torpedo-Bomber Squadron, at Siena Airfield (SM.79 Sparviero torpedo-bombers)
        • 228th and 229th flights
      • 104th Torpedo-Bomber Squadron, at Siena Airfield (SM.79 Sparviero torpedo-bombers)
        • 252nd and 253rd flights
      • 108th Torpedo-Bomber Squadron, at Pisa Airfield (SM.79 Sparviero torpedo-bombers)
        • 256th and 257th flights
      • 130th Torpedo-Bomber Squadron, at Littoria Airfield (SM.79 Sparviero torpedo-bombers)
        • 280th and 283rd flights
      • 132nd Torpedo-Bomber Squadron, at Littoria Airfield (SM.79 Sparviero torpedo-bombers)
        • 278th and 281st flights
    • 274th Long Range Bomber Flight, at Guidonia Airfield (P.108 heavy bombers)
4th Air Fleet[edit]

Aircraft of the 4th Air Fleet based in Southern Italy entered combat in support of Air Force Command Sicily from 10 July 1943. At the same date reinforcements from other air fleets began to arrive in Southern Italy to reinforce 4th Air Fleet.

Territorial Anti-aircraft Defense[edit]

The Territorial Anti-aircraft Defense (Italian: Milizia per la Difesa Contraerea Territoriale - MDICAT) was an organization of the Italian National Fascist Party's Voluntary Militia for National Security tasked with static air-defense of cities and installations. The MDICAT was organized in 22 legions, which commanded all ground-based air-defense units, including Royal Italian Army and Royal Italian Navy units, in their sector. The territorial anti-aircraft defense unit responsible for Sicily was the 22nd Territorial CC.NN. Anti-aircraft Legion. The list below gives an overview of the 22nd Legion's batteries sorted by cities with the respective services army (RA), navy (RN), and militia (CC.NN.) listed.

The anti-aircraft batteries in Messina, Reggio Calabria, Augusta, and Trapani were detached to the Royal Italian Navy's maritime military commands in these cities.

  • Territorial Anti-aircraft Defense - 22nd Territorial CC.NN. Anti-aircraft Legion, in Palermo
    • Ionia
      • 2x Anti-aircraft batteries (90/53 anti-aircraft guns; RA)
      • 2x Anti-aircraft batteries (20/65 anti-aircraft guns; RA)
    • Gerbini Airfield
      • 1x Anti-aircraft battery (37/54 anti-aircraft guns; RA)
      • 1x Anti-aircraft battery (37/54 anti-aircraft guns; CC.NN.)
      • 2x Anti-aircraft batteries (76/40 anti-aircraft guns; RA)
    • Catania
      • 460th Anti-aircraft Battery (90/53 anti-aircraft guns; CC.NN.)
      • 483rd Anti-aircraft Battery (76/40 anti-aircraft guns; RN)
      • 813th Anti-aircraft Battery (20/65 anti-aircraft guns; CC.NN.)
      • 2x Anti-aircraft batteries (37/54 anti-aircraft guns; RA)
      • 2x Anti-aircraft batteries (75/46 anti-aircraft guns; RA)
      • 5x Anti-aircraft batteries (90/53 anti-aircraft guns; CC.NN.)
      • 6x Anti-aircraft batteries (76/40 anti-aircraft guns; CC.NN.)
      • 2x Anti-aircraft batteries (37/54 anti-aircraft guns; CC.NN.)
      • 2x Anti-aircraft batteries (20/65 anti-aircraft guns; CC.NN.)
    • San Pietro Clarenza
      • XXXI Anti-aircraft Group
        • 18th and 19th Anti-aircraft batteries (76/40 anti-aircraft guns; CC.NN.)
        • 232nd and 827th Anti-aircraft batteries (20/65 anti-aircraft guns; CC.NN.)
    • Gela
      • 22nd Anti-aircraft Battery (76/40 anti-aircraft guns; CC.NN.)
      • 23rd Anti-aircraft Battery (76/40 anti-aircraft guns; CC.NN.)
      • 93rd Anti-aircraft Battery (76/40 anti-aircraft guns; CC.NN.)
      • 333rd Anti-aircraft Battery (37/54 anti-aircraft guns; RA)
      • 334th Anti-aircraft Battery (37/54 anti-aircraft guns; RA)
      • 523rd Anti-aircraft Battery (37/54 anti-aircraft guns; RA)
      • 796th Anti-aircraft Battery (20/65 anti-aircraft guns; RA)
      • 1x Anti-aircraft battery (20/65 anti-aircraft guns; RA)
    • Licata
      • 675th Anti-aircraft Battery (76/40 anti-aircraft guns; RN)
      • 791st Anti-aircraft Battery (20/65 anti-aircraft guns; CC.NN.)
    • Porto Empedocle
      • LXXVII Anti-aircraft Group
        • 644th, 645th, 646th, and 669th batteries (90/53 anti-aircraft guns; CC.NN.)
      • 1x Anti-aircraft battery (76/40 anti-aircraft guns; RN)
      • 1x Anti-aircraft battery (20/65 anti-aircraft guns; CC.NN.)
      • 1x Anti-aircraft battery (37/54 anti-aircraft guns; RA)
    • Sciacca
      • 816th Anti-aircraft Battery (20/65 anti-aircraft guns; CC.NN.)
      • 1x Anti-aircraft battery (90/53 anti-aircraft guns; CC.NN.)
      • 3x Anti-aircraft batteries (76/40 anti-aircraft guns; CC.NN.)
      • 1x Anti-aircraft battery (37/54 anti-aircraft guns; RA)
      • 1x Anti-aircraft battery (20/65 anti-aircraft guns; CC.NN.)
    • Castelvetrano
      • LXXXIII Anti-aircraft Group, at Castelvetrano
        • 629th and 653rd Anti-aircraft batteries (90/53 anti-aircraft guns; CC.NN.)
        • 795th Anti-aircraft Battery (20/65 anti-aircraft guns; CC.NN.)
      • XC Anti-aircraft Group, at Castelvetrano Airfield
        • 668th and 676th Anti-aircraft batteries (90/53 anti-aircraft guns; CC.NN.)
        • 814th Anti-aircraft Battery (20/65 anti-aircraft guns; CC.NN.)
      • 3x Anti-aircraft batteries (75/27 anti-aircraft guns; RA)
      • 4x Anti-aircraft batteries (37/54 anti-aircraft guns; RA)
      • 2x Anti-aircraft batteries (76/40 anti-aircraft guns; CC.NN.)
      • 2x Anti-aircraft batteries (75/46 anti-aircraft guns; CC.NN.)
    • Marsala
      • 476th Anti-aircraft Battery (90/53 anti-aircraft guns; CC.NN.)
      • 2x Anti-aircraft batteries (90/53 anti-aircraft guns; CC.NN.)
      • 2x Anti-aircraft batteries (20/65 anti-aircraft guns; CC.NN.)
    • Chinisia Airfield
      • LIX Anti-aircraft Group
        • 31st Anti-aircraft Battery (76/40 anti-aircraft guns; CC.NN.)
        • 2x Anti-aircraft batteries (76/40 anti-aircraft guns; CC.NN.)
      • 3x Anti-aircraft batteries (37/54 anti-aircraft guns; RA)
      • 1x Anti-aircraft battery (90/53 anti-aircraft guns; CC.NN.)
    • Palermo
      • 411th Anti-aircraft Battery (102/35 anti-aircraft guns; CC.NN.)
      • 414th Anti-aircraft Battery (76/40 anti-aircraft guns; CC.NN.)
      • 415th Anti-aircraft Battery (76/40 anti-aircraft guns; CC.NN.)
      • 418th Anti-aircraft Battery (76/40 anti-aircraft guns; CC.NN.)
      • 630th Anti-aircraft Battery (90/53 anti-aircraft guns; CC.NN.)
      • 733rd Anti-aircraft Battery (20/65 anti-aircraft guns; RA)
      • 1x Anti-aircraft battery (20/65 anti-aircraft guns; RA)
      • 2x Anti-aircraft batteries (102/35 anti-aircraft guns; CC.NN.)
      • 6x Anti-aircraft batteries (90/53 anti-aircraft guns; CC.NN.)
      • 5x Anti-aircraft batteries (76/40 anti-aircraft guns; CC.NN.)
      • 4x Anti-aircraft batteries (37/54 anti-aircraft guns; CC.NN.)
      • 3x Anti-aircraft batteries (20/65 anti-aircraft guns; CC.NN.)
    • Termini Imerese
      • 468th Anti-aircraft Battery (90/53 anti-aircraft guns; RA)
      • 3x Anti-aircraft batteries (90/53 anti-aircraft guns; RA)
      • 1x Anti-aircraft battery (20/65 anti-aircraft guns; RA)
    • Milazzo
      • 1x Anti-aircraft battery (75/46 anti-aircraft guns; CC.NN.)
      • 2x Anti-aircraft batteries (75/27 anti-aircraft guns; RA)
      • 1x Anti-aircraft battery (20/65 anti-aircraft guns; CC.NN.)

There were also single CC.NN. batteries at Portopalo di Capo Passero, Motta Sant'Anastasia, Vizzini, Pozzallo, Vittoria, Punta Secca, and Costa Raia, and two batteries at Cassibile and two at Lercara Friddi. The Royal Italian Army had single batteries at Pachino, Acireale, Ragusa, and Roccapalumba.

Other batteries deployed in Sicily in July 1943, whose location on the island is unknown, are listed below:

  • 20/65 anti-aircraft guns:
    • 59th, 284th, 792nd, 793rd, 815th, 837th, and 1506th batteries
  • 75/27 anti-aircraft guns:
    • 8th, 29th, 133rd, 331st, and 452nd batteries
  • 75/46 anti-aircraft guns:
    • 524th Battery
  • 76/40 anti-aircraft guns:
    • 625th and 648th batteries
  • 8.8 cm Flak anti-aircraft guns:
    • 1399th, 1405th, 1408th, 1415th, 1418th, and 1429th batteries
  • Batteries with unknown equipment:
    • 342nd, 345th, 413th, 417th, 504th, 650th, 908th batteries

Voluntary Militia for National Security[edit]

The Voluntary Militia for National Security (Italian: Milizia Volontaria per la Sicurezza Nazionale - MVSN) was the Italian National Fascist Party's paramilitary wing. The MVSN had police functions and provided the regime with readily available paramilitary units for internal oppression. During WWII the MVSN raised military units, which were operationally assigned to Royal Italian Army or Royal Italian Navy commands. The MVSN's command authority in Sicily was the 14th Zone and its legions, the units they raised for the defense of Sicily, and the commands these units were assigned to are listed below.

  • 14th Zone, in Palermo
    • 166th CC.NN. Legion "Peloro", in Messina (29th Infantry Division "Piemonte")
      • CLXVI (1939) (29th Infantry Division "Piemonte")
      • DLXVI Mobile Territorial CC.NN. Battalion (Maritime Military Base Messina-Reggio Calabria)
      • 50th, 51st, 52nd, 53rd, 54th, and 55th Coastal CC.NN. companies (6th CC.NN. Maritime Artillery Legion)
    • 167th CC.NN. Legion "Etna", in Catania
    • 168th CC.NN. Legion "Hyblae", in Ragusa
      • CLXVIII CC.NN. Battalion (171st CC.NN. Legion "Vespri"/ 28th Infantry Division "Aosta")
      • CCCLXVIII Mobile Territorial CC.NN. Battalion (25th Military Zone)
      • 58th and 59th Coastal CC.NN. companies (25th Military Zone)
    • 169th CC.NN. Legion "Tirreno", in Syracuse
      • CLXIX CC.NN. Battalion (173rd CC.NN. Legion "Salso"/ 54th Infantry Division "Napoli")
      • CCCLXIX Territorial CC.NN. Battalion (Maritime Military Sector Augusta-Syracuse)
      • 60th and 63rd Coastal CC.NN. companies (7th CC.NN. Maritime Artillery Legion)
    • 170th CC.NN. Legion "Agrigentum", in Agrigento
      • CCCLXX Territorial CC.NN. Battalion (25th Military Zone)
      • 67th and 68th Coastal CC.NN. companies (25th Military Zone)
    • 171st CC.NN. Legion "Vespri", in Palermo (28th Infantry Division "Aosta")
      • CLXXI CC.NN. Battalion (28th Infantry Division "Aosta")
      • CCCLXXI Territorial CC.NN. Battalion (25th Military Zone)
    • 172nd CC.NN. Legion "Enna", in Enna
      • CCCLXXII Territorial CC.NN. Battalion (25th Military Zone)
      • 72nd, 73rd, and 74th Coastal CC.NN. companies (25th Military Zone)
    • 173rd CC.NN. Legion "Salso", in Caltanissetta (54th Infantry Division "Napoli")
      • CLXXIII CC.NN. Battalion (54th Infantry Division "Napoli")
      • CCCLXXIII Territorial CC.NN. Battalion (26th Military Zone)
      • 75th Coastal CC.NN. Company (26th Military Zone)
    • 174th CC.NN. Legion "Segesta", in Trapani
      • CCCLXXIV Coastal CC.NN. Battalion (Maritime Military Sector Trapani)
      • 76th and 82nd Coastal CC.NN. companies (Maritime Military Sector Trapani)

Messina Evacuation[edit]

During Operation Lehrgang - the Axis evacuation from Sicily - the German evacuation efforts were under command of Seetransportführer Messina (Sea-transport-leader Messina) Kapitän zur See Gustav Freiherr von Liebenstein, while the Italian evacuation was organized by Ammiraglio di Squadra Pietro Barone. The Italians pressed every possible ship into service and used four evacuation routes across the Strait of Messina, while the Germans had brought three landing flotillas to Messina for the evacuation.

  • 2. Landungs-Division - Seetransportführer Messina - Kapitän zur See Gustav Freiherr von Liebenstein
    • 2. Landungs-Flottille (2nd Landing Flotilla)
      • 29x Marinefährprahm and other boats; Marinefährprahms F 147, F 466, F 146, F 432, F 460, F 546, F 434, F 618, and F 435 were lost during the evacuation of Sicily
    • 4. Landungs-Flottille (4th Landing Flotilla)
      • 31x Marinefährprahm and 12 other boats; Marinefährprahms F 466, F 432, F 460, F 430, F 429, F 462, F 607, and F 437 were lost during the evacuation of Sicily
    • 10. Landungs-Flottille (10th Landing Flotilla)
    • Pionier-Landungs-Bataillon 771 (771st Engineer Landing Battalion; Army Unit)
      • 6x Marinefährprahm, 14x landing boats, 465 meter of landing bridges, and a number of Storm boats

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

Footnotes
  1. ^ Activities in support of Special Operations Executive
  2. ^ On 17 July Guzzoni delegated tactical command to Hube of any areas containing German troops. On 30 July Guzzoni gave Hube command of the whole front[28]
Citations
  1. ^ a b c d e f g Niehorster, Leo. "World War II Armed Forces — Orders of Battle and Organizations". Retrieved October 27, 2018.
  2. ^ Molony, p. 108.
  3. ^ Richard A. Rinaldi, Royal Engineers, World War II at Orbat.com Archived 2014-12-04 at the Wayback Machine
  4. ^ Molony, p. 81n.
  5. ^ Molony, p. 177n
  6. ^ Molony, p. 102n
  7. ^ Molony, p. 152n.
  8. ^ Molony, p. 79n.
  9. ^ Molony, p. 95n.
  10. ^ Molony, p. 94n.
  11. ^ a b Molony, p. 117n
  12. ^ a b Molony, p. 115n.
  13. ^ Molony, p. 82n.
  14. ^ Molony, p. 234n.
  15. ^ "World War II War Diaries, 1941-1945, JOSS Operation Plan No. 118-43". Fold3. June 20, 1943. pp. 9–11. Retrieved November 1, 2018.
  16. ^ "World War II War Diaries, 1941-1945, JOSS Operation Plan No. 109-43". Fold3. June 20, 1943. p. 612. Retrieved October 30, 2018.
  17. ^ Craven, Wesley F. and James L. Cate. The Army Air Forces in World War II, Volume 2, Chicago, Illinois: Chicago University Press, 1949 (Reprinted 1983, ISBN 0-912799-03-X).
  18. ^ Richards, D. and H. Saunders, The Royal Air Force 1939-1945 (Volume 2, HMSO, 1953).
  19. ^ Howe, George F., Northwest Africa: Seizing the Initiative in the West, Center of Military History, Washington, DC., 1991.
  20. ^ Army Air Forces Historical Office Headquarters, Participation of the Ninth & Twelfth Air Forces in the Sicilian Campaign, Army Air Forces Historical Study No. 37, Maxwell Air Force Base, Alabama, 1945.
  21. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Secret Document 161, Location of units in the Royal Air Force, 34th issue, July 1943, Royal Air Force Museum accession number PR02859.
  22. ^ No. 242 Group was originally a part of the Northwest African Tactical Air Force but which was later[when?] transferred to NACAF
  23. ^ Participation of the Ninth & Twelfth Air Forces in the Sicilian Campaign, Army Air Forces Historical Study No. 37, Army Air Forces Historical Office Headquarters, Maxwell AFB, Alabama, 1945
  24. ^ Maurer, Maurer, Air Force Combat Units Of World War II Office of Air Force History, Maxwell AFB, Alabama, 1983.
  25. ^ a b Participation of the Ninth & Twelfth Air Forces in the Sicilian Campaign, Army Air Forces Historical Study No. 37, Army Air Forces Historical Office Headquarters Maxwell AFB, Alabama, 1945.
  26. ^ a b Maurer, Maurer, Air Force Combat Units Of World War II, Office of Air Force History Maxwell AFB, Alabama, 1983
  27. ^ a b Secret Document 161, Location of units in the Royal Air Force, 34th issue, July 1943, Royal Air Force Museum accession number PR02859.
  28. ^ Molony, p. 44.
  29. ^ Parri, Maurizio (2009). Tracce di Cingolo - Storia dei Carristi 1917-2009. Rome. pp. 123–127.
  30. ^ a b Carità, Calogero. "Le forze contrapposte alla viglia dello sbarco alleato in Sicilia". Associazione Memento Sicilia. Retrieved 7 October 2021.
  31. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Crescenzi, Andrea (2009). Fondo M-9 - Serie Sicilia (PDF). Rome: Stato Maggiore della Difesa - Ufficio Storico. pp. 18–20. ISBN 9788898185375. Retrieved 7 October 2021.
  32. ^ Faldella, Emilio (1956). Lo sbarco e la difesa della Sicilia.
  33. ^ Faldella, Emilio (1956). Lo sbarco e la difesa della Sicilia.
  34. ^ Molony, p. 43.
  35. ^ a b Molony, pp. 43-45.
  36. ^ Molony, p. 93.
  37. ^ Molony, p. 45.
  38. ^ a b c d "Cronistoria dei reparti costieri". S.M.R.E. Uff. Ordinamento e Mobilitazione. Retrieved 7 October 2021.
  39. ^ "Comando Marittimo Sicilia". Italian Navy. Retrieved 7 October 2021.
  40. ^ a b Donato, Armando. "La Piazza Marittima di Messina 1939-1943" (PDF). Societa Italiana Storia Militare. pp. 5–7. Retrieved 7 October 2021.
  41. ^ Donato, Armando. "Messina: La batteria costiera Margottini". Retrieved 7 October 2021.
  42. ^ Donato, Armando. "La Piazza Marittima di Messina 1939-1943" (PDF). Societa Italiana Storia Militare. p. 20. Retrieved 7 October 2021.
  43. ^ a b c d Zaloga, Steven J. (20 January 2013). Sicily 1943: The debut of Allied joint operations. Osprey Publishing. p. 66. ISBN 9781780961279. Retrieved 8 October 2021.
  44. ^ a b c di Rosa, Roberto (1996). La Torre Martello di Magnisi. Rome: Stato Maggiore dell'Esercito - Ufficio Storico. p. 362. Retrieved 8 October 2021.
  45. ^ a b "Treni Armati della Marina". Italian Navy. Retrieved 7 October 2021.

References[edit]

  • Juno Beach Centre - Canadian Army units in Sicily
  • Bovi, Lorenzo (2013), Sicilia.WW2: foto inedite (in Italian), Siracusa, Italy: Morrone, ISBN 978-88-97672-59-3
  • Costanzo, Ezio (2008). The Mafia and the Allies: Sicily 1943 and the Return of the Mafia. New York: Enigma Book.
  • Costanzo, Ezio (2003). Sicilia 1943. Lo sbarco alleato (in Italian). Le Nove Muse Editrice, Italy.
  • Hoyt, Edwin P. (2007) [2002]. Backwater War: The Allied Campaign in Italy, 1943-45. Mechanicsburg, PA: Stackpole Books. pp. 228–229. ISBN 978-0-8117-3382-3.
  • Jowett, Philip S. (2001). The Italian Army 1940-45. (3) Italy 1943–1945. Men-At-Arms 353. illustrated by Stephen Andrew. Oxford: Osprey Publishing. ISBN 1-85532-866-6.
  • Molony, Brigadier C.J.C.; with Flynn, Captain F.C. (R.N.); Davies, Major-General H.L. & Gleave, Group Captain T.P. (2004) [1st. pub. HMSO:1973]. Butler, Sir James (ed.). The Mediterranean and Middle East, Volume V Part 1: The Campaign in Sicily 1943 and The Campaign in Italy 3rd September 1943 to 31st March 1944. History of the Second World War, United Kingdom Military Series. Uckfield, UK: Naval & Military Press. ISBN 1-84574-069-6.